ONE TO WATCH

ONE TO WATCH

SODIUM ONE TO WATCH
 
Welcome to our new “One to Watch” portfolio section of Sodium Collective.  

At Sodium it has always been an integral part of our ethos to champion emerging, socially conscious fashion designers and creatives whose talents and stories deserve to be shared with a wider audience. 


These fashion innovators who are beginning to manifest themselves on our collective consciousness have previously been showcased as part of our main digital and print pages. As the industry recalibrate to meet the challenges of a much-changed world and Sodium realigns itself to document this new landscape, our thoughts have turned to how best showcase these new and emergent talents who exemplify the very best of fashion forward thinking.


Bringing them together in a new standalone area of the digital magazine will allow us the space to let them tell their stories and share their passion, energy and vision with you, the reader. Discussing their values and documenting their inspirations and aspirations, Sodium will take a deep dive into the creative and personal journeys which are shaping them. It's a space they richly deserve and one which deserves our undivided attention. 


We hope you will join us as we share the stories of these ones to watch, this new generation of designers and creatives, those whom we are sure will play an important and vital role in fashions future.

GRADUATION FASHION WEEK LONDON

GRADUATION FASHION WEEK LONDON

ROSE CONNOR

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My collection is inspired by the up-cycling of a house hold product, the bath scrunchie, which is often discarded after its use. The aim of my collection was to show people that the most unlikely item can be transformed from waste and up-cycled to be used as a material for fashion. The colours of my collection came from the wildlife that are affected by human waste.

The bath scrunchie garments and the drape fabric dress within my collection were experimental so I had a lot of freedom when manipulating the pieces of scrunchie material and regular fabric on the mannequin. I had no idea what the outcome of the pieces would look like until I stepped back from the mannequin. The trousers in my collection were pattern cut, and toiled first from some CAD designs I did in order to get the correct shape, then produced in the real fabrics.

I think that the UK has a long history with fashion. Clothing that is designed/manufactured within the UK holds a sense of prestige that is desirable. This could be due to the technical craft of the manufacturer or the materials that are made here.  Universities are able to allow their students to having access to work more closely with British designers and companies to reinvent/invent new trends in fashion.

 

Being involved in GFW has made a huge difference to me. It has given me the confidence to show my work to the public and demonstrate the topic of sustainability within fashion. It has also given me access to speak with industry professionals and receive feedback on my collection and portfolio.  

ROSE CONNOR

UCLAN-SodiumCollective-5266.jpg

My collection is inspired by the up-cycling of a house hold product, the bath scrunchie, which is often discarded after its use. The aim of my collection was to show people that the most unlikely item can be transformed from waste and up-cycled to be used as a material for fashion. The colours of my collection came from the wildlife that are affected by human waste.

The bath scrunchie garments and the drape fabric dress within my collection were experimental so I had a lot of freedom when manipulating the pieces of scrunchie material and regular fabric on the mannequin. I had no idea what the outcome of the pieces would look like until I stepped back from the mannequin. The trousers in my collection were pattern cut, and toiled first from some CAD designs I did in order to get the correct shape, then produced in the real fabrics.

I think that the UK has a long history with fashion. Clothing that is designed/manufactured within the UK holds a sense of prestige that is desirable. This could be due to the technical craft of the manufacturer or the materials that are made here. Being involved in GFW has made a huge difference to me. It has given me the confidence to show my work to the public and demonstrate the topic of sustainability within fashion. It has also given me access to speak with industry professionals and receive feedback on my collection and portfolio.  

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PLAIRE PIMCHANOK

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My graduate collection is called “2200: The Royal Cyborgs” and is sponsored by Swarovski. Using my birth country’s rich culture and heritage through the medium of a dystopian science fiction film, I reconstructed my own imaginative version of dystopian Bangkok future world. 

 

The collection responds to the current political situation in Thailand and the struggles of Thai people. We lost our beloved King Bhumibol Adulyadej in 2016 which deeply affected all Thais and affected the whole country not just emotionally but also economically. My collection honours the good he has done in trying to tackle poverty and homelessness. 

 

The concept of royal cyborgs was inspired by the life of the king himself as he lost his vision in his right eye after a car accident in 1948 and had to wear an artificial eyeball. I have imagined myself in his shoes and how hard it must have been to continue devoting his life to bettering the future of our country. The collection is a combination of the future and the past, looking back to late 1800s when the reign of the 5th King was signified by the modernisation of Thai infrastructure and by governmental and social reforms, and as a by-product the modernisation of women’s fashion. I have taken my inspiration from some of the luxury garments worn by the queens and princesses of this period and reinvented the elaborate historical silhouette into contemporary eveningwear.

 

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